2014 Senior Projects

Spring 2014
Monday, April 7, MCRey 315
3:00 J.B. Parker, Public Key Cryptography and the Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman Algorithm
3:30 Jeremiah Bill, The McEliece Cryptosystem: a Post-Quantum Solution to Secure Communications
Tuesday, April 8, MCRey 315
2:40 Brandon McNew, Image Distance Comparison Using FAST Feature Detection and the Stable Marriage Algorithm
3:10 Theogene Bucuti, An Investigation of the Effect of Search Ordering for Anytime Planning Performance Profiles
3:40 Jonathan Hinson, Extending Off-the-Record Messaging for Group Chat Support
4:10 Thierry Kimenyi, Sentiment Analysis of Tweets Using Machine Learning Algorithms
Wednesday, April 9, MCRey 315
3:00 Kaleigh Clary, Extension of a Red-Blue Intersection Identification Algorithm to 3D
4:00 Matt Larson, Density, Prime Numbers, and Gaps
4:30 Grace Trees, Finding 10 a Friend
Thursday, April 10, MCRey 315
2:40 Lacey Laborde, Collaborative Concert Tracking Web Application
3:10 Justin John, Music Collaboration Over the Real-Time Web
3:40 Megan Yociss, Web-Supported Game Development for Programming Education
4:10 Julie Britton, Exploring Embedded Control Systems: Managing Artificial Light Levels
Monday, April 14, MCRey 315
1:30 Lambert Rugamba, Ranking Methods

Abstracts

Presenter: Jeremiah Bill
Title: The McEliece Cryptosystem: a Post-Quantum Solution to Secure Communications
Presentation:Mon 7 Apr, 3:30pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Duff Campbell

Abstract: It has been shown that the general decoding problem is NP-complete. McEliece has shown that this serves as a suitable one-way function with which to build an encryption scheme. We evaluate the scheme here, discussing the necessary background topics in coding theory, cryptography, and cryptanalysis, concluding with a demonstration of its usefulness against quantum computing attacks.

Presenter: Julie Britton
Title: Exploring Embedded Control Systems: Managing Artificial Light Levels
Presentation:Thu 10 Apr, 4:10pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Carl Burch

Abstract: Embedded control systems are one way that energy consumption and cost can be reduced for both business expenditures and increased efficiency. In such a system, microprocessors address the specific task of controlling one aspect of the environment. One implementation, a light sensor system to incorporate natural light with artificial light, can work to dim artificial light in accordance to natural light in order to better manage resources.

In designing this control system, there are several steps which must be addressed. First, inexpensive and easily replaceable components work to increase reliability while keeping costs down. An appropriate microprocessor that can accomplish the tasks must be selected. Finally, software must be developed which takes input from the sensors, calculates a control effort, and outputs the control effort to the actuator. A straightforward implementation might use C or a C- like language innate to the microprocessor. However, other considerations as to what the best software should look like must be made. By using the occam-pi language and exploring what changes can be made to the software environment to best accommodate control systems, this research looks to answer the question: what does a reasonable solution for an embedded control system managing artificial light levels look like?

Presenter: Theogene Bucuti
Title: An Investigation of the Effect of Search Ordering for Anytime Planning Performance Profiles
Presentation:Tue 8 Apr, 3:10pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Gabe Ferrer

Abstract: TBA

Presenter: Kaleigh Clary
Title: Extension of a Red-Blue Intersection Identification Algorithm to 3D
Presentation:Wed 9 Apr, 3:00pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Chris Camfield

Abstract: The red-blue intersection problem involves identifying intersections between sets of red and blue line segments in the plane. In 2011, Cortes presented an algorithm for finding intersections in O(n²) time. We attempt an extension of this algorithm to R³ as well as analyze the extension's complexity.

Presenter: Jonathan Hinson
Title: Extending Off-the-Record Messaging for Group Chat Support
Presentation:Tue 8 Apr, 3:40pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Gabe Ferrer

Abstract: Networking technologies, especially those adopted in professional settings, require security measures in order to keep our conversations and other information private. The Off-the- Record Messaging Protocol provides a novel means of securing instant messages over an insecure network. Unfortunately, the OTR protocol currently only supports instant messaging between two parties. This thesis studies and analyzes three proposed methods of extending the OTR protocol for group messaging support.

Presenter: Justin John
Title: Music Collaboration Over the Real-Time Web
Presentation:Thu 10 Apr, 3:10pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Carl Burch

Abstract: TBA

Presenter: Thierry Kimenyi
Title: Sentiment Analysis of Tweets Using Machine Learning Algorithms
Presentation:Tue 8 Apr, 4:10pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Carl Burch

Abstract: Twitter today has become a very popular microblogging and communication tool among internet users. Users share opinions on different aspects of life. Therefore, Twitter is a rich source of data for opinion mining and sentiment analysis. Results found can be used in marketing and social studies. Previous work have used a corpus of tweets to train machine learning algorithms like Naive Bayes and Maximum entropy that can then classify a new tweet as either positive or negative. The purpose of this research is to study and compare those two methods and see if we can improve their accuracy by considering the full Twitter Object.

Presenter: Lacey Laborde
Title: Collaborative Concert Tracking Web Application
Presentation:Thu 10 Apr, 2:40pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Gabe Ferrer

Abstract: There exists a shortage of web applications tracking upcoming concerts in small cities. The low number of well-established music venues in these areas makes it difficult for developers to create such web applications. In these cities, music venue websites are not always readily available for developers to look to for concert details to populate their web applications’ databases. To combat this issue, this project considers an additional input source: users. The web application detailed in this paper mimics “word-of-mouth” publicity by allowing users to submit concerts to be added to the web application’s concert schedule.

Students of Hendrix College, located in Conway, AR, tested this project. The effectiveness of the project was evaluated in two ways. First, students were simply asked to use the web application and determine whether or not they believed it could serve as a useful tool for learning about upcoming concerts. Next, access logs for the website hosting the application were evaluated two weeks before and two weeks after the application was launched to determine whether or not the website saw an increase in traffic after the addition of the web application. Over 90% students surveyed believed the web application could be a useful tool, and traffic to website hosting the web application did, in fact, see a noticeable increase in daily traffic. These results demonstrate that by relying on the collaborative input of both web administrators and users, a concert tracking web application can be created to serve as a utility for helping residents of small towns learn about upcoming concerts.

Presenter: Matt Larson
Title: Density, Prime Numbers, and Gaps
Presentation:Wed 9 Apr, 4:00pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Chris Camfield

Abstract: This project provides a proof stating that ratios of prime numbers of dense in the real line. Following this proof, this project explores density of ratios of other sets. The ultimate goal is to see if there is a specific set, whose ratios are dense, that can accurately express the spacing between prime numbers.

Presenter: Brandon McNew
Title: Image Distance Comparison Using FAST Feature Detection and the Stable Marriage Algorithm
Presentation:Tue 8 Apr, 2:40pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Gabe Ferrer

Abstract: This paper addresses the issue of Euclidean distance when used for image comparison by suggesting a different approach to image distance calculation. The Euclidean distance does not account for minor transformations between two images. We present two algorithms, FAST feature extraction and the Stable Marriage Algorithm, in conjunction that base image distance on a stabilized match of extracted features. By using feature distances as our output, we hope to eliminate the flaw of the Euclidean distance for image comparison. First, we explain how each algorithm works individually. Then, we explain how they are joined together to approach the problem. Finally, we present the results of our output compared against the Euclidean distance output.

Presenter: J.B. Parker
Title: Public Key Cryptography and the Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman Algorithm
Presentation:Mon 7 Apr, 3:00pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Prof. Lars Seme

Abstract: Public key cryptography has recently become integrated in our lives through the necessity for secure internet communication. This paper explores the most common current public key cryptosystem, RSA. It also explores a relatively new, more efficient cryptosystem that will soon come into common use both alongside and as a replacement for RSA, Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

Presenter: Lambert Rugamba
Title: Ranking Methods
Presentation:Mon 14 Apr, 1:30pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Prof. Lars Seme

Abstract: It is important in many situations to be able to rank (i.e. order) different groups. For example, in sports leagues it is often necessary to rank the various teams, based on the outcome of game. In this research, two ranking methods are considered: the Massey and Colley Methods. Proofs are provided to explain how and why the methods work, as is an example to compare the results of the two methods.

Presenter: Grace Trees
Title: Finding 10 a Friend
Presentation:Wed 9 Apr, 4:30pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Chris Camfield

Abstract: The index function for a positive integer n is the divisor function divided by the integer. In number theory, a positive integer is said to be friendly if there exists a different positive integer with the same index value. An integer whose index value is unique is said to be solitary. This project focuses on integers who have yet to be characterized as friendly or solitary. The smallest element of this set of unknown integers is 10. Although a friend of 10 has not yet been discovered, a lower bound for the value of 10's friend can be established.

Presenter: Megan Yociss
Title: Web-Supported Game Development for Programming Education
Presentation:Thu 10 Apr, 3:40pm, MCRey 315
Advisor: Dr. Carl Burch

Abstract: TBA